Taking a Creative Approach to CX

Taking a Creative Approach to CX

I ask that same question when I’m working with customers and my teammates to improve our products. “Sure, this works fine, but how could it be better?”
by Travis Musgrave

 

I’m from Lorena Texas, but I came to Nashville in January of 2016.

When I tell people I’m from a cattle ranching family in Texas, they usually ask me what brought me to Nashville. The answer is a far cry from ranching…I came for tech.

After graduating from Baylor University with a degree in Computer Information Systems, I came to Edgenet to start my tech career. In my position as Product Owner, I assist in designing and creating SaaS products with functionalities that help customers do their jobs more efficiently, and with more accurate results. When managing these products, it is crucial to put yourself in the shoes of the customer so you can affect change that will assist them in managing their product content. It’s my job to understand the needs of the customer and provide an informed solution to their business problem. That means thoroughly listening to their feedback, and thinking creatively in order to probe past superficial issues to find the root of the problem. If you can’t figure out the cause of their business problem, you can’t provide an effective solution.

While I always seek out and listen to feedback from customers to help shape our products, I also have to find ways to keep my brain trained outside of work to keep my problem-solving skills sharp. I’m lucky that I have a group of good friends to bounce ideas off of. We have a habit of pushing each other to think outside of the box and build things that solve problems.

Take moving, for example, everyone hates moving, it’s a universal pain. Moving furniture through halls and doorways you swear shrunk overnight, there are always some marks left behind. We began brainstorming ways to minimize damage from moving furniture. Before long, we came up with the design for some sturdy, 3D printed plastic attachable covers for walls and door frames.

Even if we just spend our time improving on simple, existing products, exercises like these give me a chance to flex that creative problem-solving muscle outside of work. I ask that same question when I’m working with customers and my teammates to improve our products. “Sure, this works fine, but how could it be better?” If I spend time training my brain doing something fun and challenging outside of work, I find it easier to keep that same kind of creative, pragmatic mindset within the workplace.  I rely on my extracurricular problem solving to help me do my job at Edgenet.

 

To hear more from Travis, visit his LinkedIn.

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